It doesn’t have me…

I read something a while ago and I may have mentioned it here already, or I may not have.

I have cancer, cancer doesn’t have me.

It was one of the mantras that sort of pushed me through everything. Knowing that I was the one in charge, it helped.

This generalizes to other areas of life, you know? Other diseases, disorders, and disabilities. Those Ds are not what define us. We are what define us.

I recently heard someone use the word “autistic,” and I realized in that moment how much I hated that word. I’m sure I’ve used it myself at some point, we all probably have, but ughhhh I hate it.

Why do I feel so strongly about an adjective?

Because adjectives are descriptors. Adjectives are used to help paint a picture of something. My hair is brown. My dog is chubby. This guy is tall.

That boy is autistic.

What exactly are we saying about the boy? We’re using a word, a disability at that, to define him. I feel like calling him autistic is like saying that’s all there is to him.

Yes, for people with autism, it often does define so much of their life. So much of their family’s life, too. But it’s a disorder, and who wants to be described that way?

That boy has autism.

That sentence says the same thing, but I feel like it’s empowering. He has autism, autism doesn’t have him.

It’s probably safe to say that most people who know someone with autism hate the disorder but love the person. So why use that as a descriptor?

Sorry for the rambling, but it’s just something that came to me when I heard that person say that. Maybe it doesn’t make sense at all, maybe it does.

On a side note, for those of you who don’t know, I work as a behavior technician and provide ABA therapy to kids with autism, hence the reason I feel so strongly about it. I’m actually pursuing certification in behavior analysis so I can make a career out of helping these amazing kiddos.

Last infusion is tomorrow, folks! Woohoo!